Articles by Vincent Gaine

The Critical Movie Critics

Dr. Vincent M. Gaine is a film and television researcher. His first book, Existentialism and Social Engagement in the Films of Michael Mann was published by Palgrave MacMillan in 2011. His work on film and media has been published in Cinema Journal and The Journal of Technology, Theology and Religion, as well as edited collections including The 21st Century Superhero and The Directory of World Cinema.


Movie Review: Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken! (2017)

Who fancies a chicken sandwich? Would you like it grilled? Fried? Crispy? Imagine that fresh-looking white meat, that crunchy coating, the mayonnaise and lettuce, the bun that is just moist enough without being soggy. Delicious, right? Healthier than a McDonald’s burger, surely? After viewing Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!, the latest film from Morgan…

Movie Review: Official Secrets (2019)

Politicians spouting foolish and frightening rhetoric is almost run of the mill these days. As a result, recollections of simpler times are suggested by news footage of Tony Blair and George W. Bush talking about weapons of mass destruction, the invasion of Iraq and UN resolutions, times before the confusion of Brexit Britain and Trump’s…

Movie Review: Le Mans ‘66 (2019)

Is Le Mans ’66 (also known as “Ford v Ferrari” in the U.S.) about racing? It’s a question comparable to “Is ‘Jaws’ about a shark?” or “Is ‘Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy’ about espionage?” Certainly racing features in the film, leading up to, as it does, the 1966 Le Mans Grand Prix, as well as other…

Movie Review: Terminator: Dark Fate (2019)

Here we go again. This is a phrase that can be uttered (silently, out of respect to fellow viewers) to many aspects of Terminator: Dark Fate. Sometimes it may be uttered with glee, other times with impatience or even exasperation. On the one hand, it demonstrates the continued appeal of James Cameron’s original creation. On…

Movie Review: Spiral (2019)

Like the more prominent “It: Chapter Two,” Spiral opens with a homophobic attack, one that is shown in all its distressing viciousness. From there, events spiral (sorry) into an eerie, menacing folk horror of cult, prejudice and scapegoating, in a manner that combines the best elements of “Get Out” and “Hereditary.” The film exposes prejudice…

Movie Review: Little Monsters (2019)

As lazy and obvious a comment as this is, Little Monsters is the Australian answer to “Shaun of the Dead.” From the interweaving of domestic and personal issues with the problems of a zombie outbreak, to the referential rendering of the undead and how they operate, writer-director Abe Forsythe displays a snappy wit, a warmth…

Movie Review: Joker (2019)

Shakespeare’s Richard III famously said I can smile, and murder while I smile. The Joker has long been a character who will smile and cackle while he murders and terrorizes. In previous cinematic incarnations, the Joker has been a crime boss fried in acid (Jack Nicholson), an anarchic terrorist (Heath Ledger) and a pimped out…

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