Articles by Howard Schumann

The Critical Movie Critics

I am a retired father of two living with my wife in Vancouver, B.C. who has had a lifelong interest in the arts.


Movie Review: Coco (2017)

“Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die” — Buddha Directed by Lee Unkrich (“Toy Story 3”) and Adrian Molina, Coco, the latest animated film from Disney-Pixar tells us to follow our dreams, seize the moment, and regard our family as paramount. These ideals can often be mutually…

Movie Review: Dawson City: Frozen Time (2016)

Dawson City, British Columbia is a place where dreams began and dreams ended. Located about 350 miles south of the Arctic Circle, Dawson City was established in 1896 with 3,500 residents and was home to the native Hän speaking people who lived along the Yukon River, harvesting salmon and hunting caribou. As boatloads of gold…

Movie Review: Kedi (2016)

In Kedi, Ceyda Torun’s documentary about the cats of Istanbul, Turkey, one interviewee says that cats can be “cold and abrasive” and that a relationship with a cat is like “having a friendship with an alien.” Not having too many friendships with aliens lately, I cannot comment on that, but it is clear that, whether…

Movie Review: Maudie (2016)

In the typical Hollywood success story, a talented individual starts out in life with a full head of steam, gets a bad break, and then, with the help of a teacher or other mentor, overcomes adversity and the story ends on a note of triumph and tears. Things are not so simple, however, for Canadian…

Movie Review: Darkest Hour (2017)

Allen Packwood, director of the Churchill Archives Centre referred to former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill as an “incredibly complex, contradictory, and larger-than-life human being.” This complexity is lost, however, in Joe Wright’s (“Pan”) Darkest Hour, a look at a crucial time in British Prime Minister Churchill’s stewardship that covers the period from May 10,…

Movie Review: The Shape of Water (2017)

While we know that some monsters are decidedly not lovable, the creature in Mexican director Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water, like many humans who roam the planet, is more of a lonely outcast seeking connection than a life-threatening presence. Performed by Doug Jones (“The Bye Bye Man”) underneath all the prosthetics, this monster…

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